Road Warrior/White Line Fever: The Biker Gangs show up


I’ve promised to post some pictures of the Motorcycle Gang I’ve built up via selected purchases over the last 6 months.  Unless inspiration hits me, this will probably the last vehicle pictures posted before HISTORICON.

This is a mix of Stan Johanesen Biker Gang (Stan’s website is referred to many times in Road Warrior posts) and Ramshackle Games 20mm Biker Gangs, which is a recent discovery.  The Ramshackle biker gangs are definitely smaller than the Stan Johansen figures (as you can see easily in the photograph above– the Ramshackle items have tan bases).   So the Ramshackle Games stuff are more like the Mini-bikes of Minor Troublemaking than the Harleys of Death.    I don’t care; they look pretty good, just can’t really scale to the StanJo stuff.  They have one great benefit: affordability.  I ordered a giant biker gang in resin, in assorted poses, for a very affordable price.  I’m not complaining.

Here are a lot of Ramshackle Games 20mm bikes, and a couple of Aberrant games Warlands motorcycles (round brown bases, plus the quad in the bottom right).  The rest are StanJo Biker Gang figures.

Last but not least, the Aberrant Games’ Warland GyroCopter (left) plus some Ramshackle 20mm bikes and StanJo figures in foreground.

I like the look of these figures and I’m not overly concerned about the scaling if they are at least reasonably close.  They won’t really all be bunched up together in the course of a game, anyway.

White Line Fever used in an actual game


One of the new covers. I like this one..

The Brooklyn Wargaming club recently ran a game of Road Warrior/White Line Fever and it appears as if they had a ripsnorting success.  Apparently they used a a version of the Road Warrior Rules (v. 2.65) in Digital Rules (above).  This blog received minimal notice but that’s okay, it’s the internet.

Shane Metzger, who created the car/vehicle sheets for RW/WLF, ran the game ran this game for the Brooklyn Wargaming club.  I was very impressed with the little touches he added to the game.  For instance, Dust trails for when you are offroad.  And little heaps of track junk.   And explosions.

BATTLE PICTURES

CAR CONVERSIONS

Here are some more pictures of his game and his great car conversions.

I’ll be adding some material Shane came up with to the main rulebook in the next release!

Which cover for Road Warrior/White Line Fever


I was playing around with a typographic app on my ipad last night, and was surprised at how good the images being created were.  So I made some new covers.  I am not sure which I like more.

OR…..

I like the starkness of number one, but also the red desert element of number 2.

ALSO RANS

and

lastly,

LMK Which you prefer

The Weekend: Gaming on the Mellow Side


I’ve been meaning to catch Otto Schmidt’s THE WEEKEND for a long time now. It’s been tough, as June is a busy month usually with high school age kids.  Now that one is in college and the other is in his last year, I thought I’d spread my wings a little and manage a day trip.  Background: the Weekend is held late June, and appears to be a 3 day affair, so it is about as much of a commitment as any small convention in terms of time.  As I recall, this was started by Otto Schmidt as an alternative for HISTORICON when the latter was slated to go to a much more expensive venue in Baltimore, MD (this did not transpire, for many reasons).  Otto wanted the Weekend to be a gathering of old friends who wanted to blab, gossip, game and hang out.  It is held at the Continental Inn off of Route 30 pretty much right across the street from the Lancaster Host, site of Fall-IN! and Cold Wars.

The Inn is an old building, family owned and operated.  It has seen some hard usage but is not what I would call “a dump” by any means.  The hotel has a major meeting space downstairs and other, smaller rooms here and there in the upper and lower lobby floors.  Frankly, I would have killed for a space like this back in the TriadCon days.  If we’d only known.   It’s not perfect– the handicapped facilities are about as non-existent as they are at the Host if not worse (no elevators in critical areas; no handicapped bathroom stalls) but you can always drive around back to the lower level to unload things, which is a plus.

There is a MST3K (Military Science Theater 3000) set up for this con but I wasn’t there for that.  No vendors that I could see, and a desultory bring-n-buy style flea market.  That was about the normal convention “stuff” present.


An exquisite Age of Reason battle in 15mm, created by Bill Grey, the Author of Age of Eagles. Click the picture to see more.

I got there a little after noon (due to traffic and helping get my son ready for camp).  Literally, I spent much of my time there BSing and catching up with friends, so I’d say Otto’s goals for this convention are certainly being met.  It was great seeing many people I haven’t seen in a month of Sundays, including Dennis Largess, Rich Low, Andy Turlington, Bill Grey, Bob Leibl, Cleo Hanlon, and Pete Frechtling.  And Otto of course, but I talk to him on the phone frequently.

Mr. Tracy Johnson ran AFTER THE HOLOCAUST, the old rare SPI game on a giant splodey map with army men. It had a great look to it. For other pictures, click on the picture above

When I got there there was an ACW game going on in the corner, and two being set up, an AFTER THE HOLOCAUST (SPI) game being rendered in miniature form by Tracy Johnson, a two player game set in 1714 being run by Bill Gray,  and an I Leonardo game run by Pete Frechtling.

I definitely wanted to play the I Leonardo game, by temperament and experience.  I’ve played in Pete Frechtling’s skewed version of the Italian Wars (with Leonardo Da Vinci tanks, helicopters, gliders and etc.).  So with your kind forbearance, I will sketch things out as best I can, providing something of an “After the Battle” report of sorts.

The basic set up was the Imperials holding a bastion with supplies on one side of a canal that opened up into a river.  There was only one established bridge over the river (made of stone) and it was being defended by a force of two commands of Imperials, with two Leonardo style tanks each (not the conical tanks, the flat ones).  The Imperials also had a ship loaded with mixed troops and cannon to defend the water entrance with.   On the far side of the canal were the Allies– British (red striped tank), Swiss (green striped tank) and French (blue striped tank).  Each Ally had one “castle” style Leonardo tank, painted as I have noted, plus a wild mixture of artillery, infantry and a little cavalry.  I took the French (blue striped) command on the far right of the line.  I had the tank as mentioned, a grenadier, Leonardo himself, some engineers, some cavalry units, some foot knights, and a bridging unit (important!).   The Swiss to my left were in the center.  They had more artillery than I and some ruins to hide in.  They kept a hot fire going against the forces that would venture clear enough to be shot at in the center of the line opposite us.  At the far left was the British and the Allies’ two ships.  The ships also (important!) had a bridging unit.   The idea being they would sail into the canal, beach, and construct the bridge from their ship to the opposing side.

I didn’t spend a lot of time tracking the naval conflict, but it was protracted and savage.

The English engaged such targets of opportunity as were available across the canal.  With the canal there to impede movement the battle became kind of a long ranged slugging match over the canal as both sides attempted to bombard each other.  The big guns on the Imperial side were their two flat rectangular tanks, and a flame thrower style vehicle that was somewhat hindered by being in the midst of a pack of infantry.

We were in a stalemate for the first few turns.. The French being the closest to the existing bridge (played by your humble correspondent) we were going to have to swarm over it somehow and take the bridge.. Unfortunately the Imperials had placed one of their two precious tanks to cover that very narrow defile, and they were aggressively defending with everything at their disposal, including a land rocket that misfired and went fizzing off in a random direction (panicking my troops but causing no damage).   My plan was to make a big demonstration and hoo-hah at the center bridge and focus the defenders there, while building my bridge train on the far right of the battlefield.

 
Now that’s a satisfying reaction! More smoke clouds please.

The Swiss did their best to support me, and were game to swarm over the center bridge as well, but we had to move the vehicles out of the way to accomplish this.  They had the advantage of some ruins to disperse into and set up artillery and other fun Leonardo style weapons (including a machine gun) to plaster the Imperial bridge defenders with.  I had a single artillery piece on my front which did some service fighting the opposing tank unit.  About midway through the game I steamed over the bridge and tried for a ram on the opposing tank.  Yes, I know this sounds decidedly risky but sometimes  you have to push things to win things.  The ram did not accomplish much, nor did the follow on fire into his sides at point blank range.  It wasn’t a bad idea, really, I just rolled pretty badly throughout the game.  I followed it up with a fusilade of infantry attacks which DID cause problems… the French grenadier tossed a grenade into the mix and it actually exploded more or less correctly, starting a fire and killing several of the crew.

Here we come, you knaves! Take that, and that, and that…

Meanwhile the bridge building gang on the right had succeeded at their task and the first independent bridgehead over the canal had happened.  The opposing player realized this and moved half-armored knights into the gap to engage with me.   On the left, the Imperials attempted to move all their infantry down the road, lost their general to gunfire, and moved their secret weapons out to engage the Allied Ships, which had bested the Imperial and were heading up the channel.  The flaming water borne holocaust the Imperial player was loudly fantasizing over (repeatedly) did not transpire, and thus the left flank was able to create a bridgehead over the canal as well.

Victory is nigh!!!

Although we were slated to play until 10PM, I was being frantically called from the home front, over a matter of shoes for my son’s camp.  Timing came together wonderfully, as Peter declared the game a victory for the Allies at the end of the turn where the second bridgehead had taken place.  This makes sense.  Although the center bridge was very much in dispute, I could still push men over the the entangled two tanks and even though the defenders had a larger group of infantry there, it was so narrow between the buildings he would never have the chance to use them effectively.  I actually welcomed such a push of the pike.    The much referenced “secret weapon” (flamethrower) amounted to almost nothing and the two Imperial tanks were heavily damaged.  The French tank (mine) had suffered damage but was still firing and reloading.  I was expecting casualties on the right flank as our crossing attempts had triggered some ambuscades from hidden troops.  Still, I could see the tide of battle was changing rapidly in our favor, and who was I to contest the GM’s view of things, anyway?  My thoughts on the I, Leonardo game system was that it seems remarkably bloodless.  Most of the Imperial arsenal was taking a heavy pound throughout the game and we really didn’t kill much of anything– we disabled a lot, and killed some crews.. but that’s about it.  I would like to redo the charts to this one some day.. just pondering.  I like the system itself just fine, but it’s really for a history geek audience who pretty much know the subject already.

For an amusing SLIDESHOW of the I LEONARDO BATTLE, click here.

As mentioned, I had to depart earlier than planned to solve a problem at home but I was glad I had an opportunity (at long last) to visit THE WEEKEND.

Major Guidebook Update for HISTORICON 2015


Hey HMGS Convention Attendees, we have a MAJOR Guidebook Update for you.

Hey Historicon! There’s an app for that!

First of all, I tried floating events early without room numbers.  That was a bad idea, as updating them (later) WITH the numbers nuked most of what I had done before, causing me to reenter data for tournaments and seminars!  Woo hoo! I love entering data twice.

So I’m making a business decision– we don’t post events (that is, regular games) until the events guy irons out what the table numbers are and where they are at.. it’s too painful to bounce back if the earlier input crashes on you.  If that means we post Guidebook a little closer to the event, so be it.

So, what do we have?

  • TOURNAMENTS (again)
  • SEMINARS (again)
  • HOBBY UNIVERSITY (first time)
  • GAMES (again)
  • Maps!

What am I missing?  The map of the Exhibitor Hall and Exhibitor List.

And then we will be done, unless we get new games between now and the convention itself.

How to get it

Go to the Guidebook Landing Page which is HERE and follow directions.

To Preview the Guide

Go to the Preview Page which is here

Historicals versus Non-Historical Count

New feature: I thought I’d do an actual count by period.  The reality of Non-Historical versus Historical by counting the actual numbers, not by hand waving*:


Source: Events Spreadsheet extracted on 6/18/2015, Historicon 2015

So the reality is 20% non-historical games at Historicon.  And I’m grouping in anything that could remotely be considered fantasy and SF together.  There are the numbers.

Events by Rules mentioned in PEL


You may have to click to see original size. There were a lot of rule sets.

This was all over the map.. there were a lot of rule sets being used.  Where it was possible I combined version and flavors and variants into the parent.

In any event, there’s the true facts, and a big, big, big guidebook update.  See you at HISTORICON 2015.

* Note on the period count above– it excludes all tournaments, which probably should be entered under fantasy in some respects.  Did I say that out loud?  I’m trying not to snark…

Saxon Warband just about done


I took a break from feverish working on HISTORICON projects to base up some SAGA figures for my SAXON Saga army.  I currently have painted:

1 warlord stand
5-7 HG armored mail and shield
9 Warriors mix of sword and spear, some armor
12 peasants using Spears
9 Archers

Here are some pictures

Warlord Stand: Gripping Beast plus unknown standard bearer (flea market figure)

HEARTH GUARD (HG) are elite fighters, deployed in small numbers. I believe I’ll field either 8 or 4 of these. This is a mix of Gripping Beast’s SAXON warband pack and some extras from flea market.

WARRIORS are trained, partly armored men who have been in battles before. Most of these are Gripping Beast
LEVY are peasants whose training consists of knowing which end of the spear is “pointy like”

ARCHERS are something I added on, mostly from Wargames Factory Saxons packs.

I might be able to finish it up with what I have on hand but who knows, any excuse to attend flea market.  My intention is to field a SIX POINT army, so he advised:

  • 3 more archers
  • 1 more hearth guard
    7 more warriors.

Some Road Warrior/White Line Fever Edits, ver. 2.65 out now, plus Veh. Sheets


rwrulescover

Sorry to keep doing this to anyone who is interested, but I got some feedback to from a guy who ran these rules recently and he had some handy suggestions.  Out of this came the recent Trifold handout (which I revised the main text in the Epub to match in v. 2.5) and also the new Vehicle Sheets which are attached*.

Version 2.65 revision expands the vehicle statistics (what do these MEAN?) and shows an example of a filled in Vehicle Sheet.   I don’t forsee any other major changes before Historicon.  I might have some changes in the wake of a large multi-player game at a convention, but nothing to worry about until then.

Thanks to Shane Metzger for both his feedback and contributing vehicle sheets to this design.   Contributions like his only make a game better.

* The Vehicle Sheet sample linked to this post is in the PowerPoint 2013 format.

Road Warrior/WLF Quickref Trifold Released, also slight integral change in EPUB


QuickRef 1.0, all folded into a nice trifold brochure format. Print ’em out, hand em out to your players.

I was getting some questions about the rules in the EPUB listed in the Digital Rules section, and that’s entirely fair, trying to blend two vastly different literary styles into a single coherent document can be tough on clarity and coherence. Forgive me my foibles; I will rewrite it at some point in the future.

In the meantime, I have a solution.  Attached is a QUICKREF file that is a PDF, meant to be printed and handed out.  This will clarify turn order, how to fire weapons, ramming, damage, and cumulative damage (if you like that “hit point” model of damage).  You will still need the EPUB for the Weapons and Damage Tables, but this should help for a non-tablet using audience.

Concurrently, I have appended the cumulative damage rule in the Appendix, and reworded ramming to make it more clear, in the base epub (now version 5).  Download from the usual  places in Digital Rules.

Kickstarter Incoming: Sultan’s Library


Disclaimer: This is a Kickstarter Incoming post.  That means the game does not exist in final form yet.  Therefore, any comments on design or components will only reflect what I have seen at the time this is written.

Company: Photon Games
Funding Status:
Unknown
Current Status: “artwork about 50% finished” — from publisher
Launch Date: 02 June 2015
 Publication Date if Funded: January 2016

Today’s Kickstarter Incoming is SULTAN’S LIBRARY, a (mostly) card game design by Ryno Laurens. Players assume the role of an Envoy of the Sultan, sent out by their bibliophile employer to gather certain rare books and return them to his Library. Each envoy (see below) has a special action that is printed on their card. These special actions can be used during Action Rounds during the player’s turn.


Sultan’s library Envoys (From the PNP, may not be final images)

Each turn, a player has two actions for exploring the world and looking for books. Players need to pick up any books they find and bring them back to the Sultan’s Library for scoring. Once any Envoy has deposited 3 books, the remaining players finish out the round.

A turn (which  I think is the same thing as a round, I’m not sure) starts with players drawing 2 cards.  They then take two actions from this list:

  1. Explore the Area: ​You can pay the Explore cost of the Location you are in to look for a Book in that area. Flip over the top card of the Location Deck. If it is a Book, put it in your Location. If its a Location Card, you Travel to that Location. Discard your old Location Card.
  2. Pick Up a Book:​ When you are in the same Location as a Book, you can pick it up. When you pick up a Book, your Character is Holding that Book until you can Deposit it. You can only Hold 2 Books at once.
  3. Deposit a Book:​When you are in the Sultan’s Library, you can Deposit a Book that you are Holding.
  4. Play an Action Card:​You can play any Action Card that you have in your hand.
  5. Perform your Special Action:​You can perform your Envoy’s Special Action as noted on their Character Card.
  6. Travel to a Location:​You can move to any face­up Location by paying 2 more Explore points than is shown on that card. Discard your old Location Card.  Note: Location Cards have special powers that may limit player’s actions (see below).
  7. Scrounge: ​You may spend 2 Actions to draw 1 Card from the Action Deck.


A Location Card (from PNP materials, may not be final)

The turn/round ends when the player scores by placing books in the library.  The player also discards his hand down to 5 cards at this time.

Sample book cards from the PNP materials (may not be final)

I am not clear after reading the rules how the game progresses around the table, or how cards are played against other players, although the text on the card suggests what to do, but not really how.. play it like an interrupt?  Can the target player defend?

Journey Cards (may not be final)

I’m sure that will be clarified somewhere– again, I’m drawing conclusions from a vague description, some youtube videos and the PNP rule book, so I’m not clear on the inter-player dynamics of Sultan’s Library

Conclusions

I like the Arabian Knights style theme; it seems to fit the mechanics reasonably well.  The artwork (what is accomplished so far) is pretty well executed.  I think they are going for “Whimsical” here, and for the most part they achieve it.  The mechanics seem reasonable enough, but I’ve never played it, so I’m not entirely sure– there are elements of interaction that seem missing from the rulebook.  I liked the way the location cards added to the game narrative.    There’s potential here, I sense it.

Horns, by Joe Hill (a short review)


HornsHorns by Joe Hill

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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Horns is my first Joe Hill book completed (I tried NOS4R2 as an audio book a while back but ran out of time and gave up at checking it out again, so it doesn’t count). Horns is the story of one Ignatius “Ig” Parrish, lovelorn victim of a horrible crime where the love of his life is cruelly and casually raped and strangled to death, and he is blamed for it. Although his actions aren’t specifically stated as a cause of his ensuing problems, when Ig drunkenly smashes the religious figures set out for his girlfriend’s memory after a candlelight prayer vigil, he wakes up the next day with horns. As in the devil kind. Small at first, then larger and and larger as the course of time passes in the book. Ig notices something strange right off the mark. When people encounter the horns, they have a hard time seeing them– as if there is a strong influence on them to forget about them and look elsewhere. Also, when people encounter the Horns, they feel compelled to tell Ig things. Nasty things.. their inner monologue suddenly becomes external. Ig starts to encounter a phenomenon.. people are telling him their dark desires so they can get Ig to “give permission” to do bad things. Initially repulsed, Ig sees the practical side of his newfound power of compulsion, and uses it to help solve his girlfriend’s murder. I won’t give up any more of the plot here, as I’m already treading on spoiler territory.

Suffice to say the murderer is no great surprise, in fact, the book telegraphs it pretty early. The rest of the story unfolds around what Ig can possibly do with that information to extract some measure of justice from the situation. It’s an interesting and sometimes quite funny narrative. I liked the very subtle ending and the notion that Ig may have “fixed things” after all, but there is a lot of that imagery-vs-reality language going on in Ig’s portion of the story. Viewpoints shift between main characters from time to time and the narrative bounces between flashbacks, points of view and sometimes allegorical imagery. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Horns is a fun (not profound) read, and Mr. Hill definitely inherited the storyteller’s gift from his father.

I did catch the movie based on the book on NETFLIX; I can’t recommend it. The story is greatly changed, the killer actually LESS telegraphed and entirely unexplained or hinted at, which made his revelation jarring. Still, if you haven’t read the book you might be amused!

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Happy Anniversary to 3PoS


Today is the sixth year of this blog, which commenced on this day in 2009, after porting all content (somewhat inexpertly) from its previous existence as “Another Point of Singularity” on Blogger.com.   As I mention in “About 3PoS” above, this is the successor to the blogger.com blog, and the xanga.com blog long before that.  So in a sense this effort has been ongoing since 2004.

6 Years on I have to say I made the correct decision to migrate to WordPress.com.  I am entirely happy with the control, the security, and the efforts WP.com goes to to keep out annoying spam comments.

During the six years, readership has grown at a nice curve– nothing explosive or exponential, but readership is up, followers are up and subscriptions are up.   Way above where they were in 2009. That works for me.  As I’ve said before, I’m not selling anything, I’m not trying to make a political or social “point”, I’m not part of a cult, society, or any other societal cluster that requires validation from internet traffic.   Sure, I could be more controversial, I guess, or more prolific, but that’s starting to be more work than it’s worth.

I’m content if someone reads a post once in a while, but I really just write these things for the sheer fun of the process.

Trends: Gaming has always been a huge focus for this blog and continues to be.  Reviewing things has gone up– not just games but books as well.

My most popular posts continue to be an ill-mannered screed against Games Workshop I posted four years ago, and a nostalgia piece about the ads for the Submarines in the back of comic books of long ago.  So go figure.

I have no plans to quit any time soon, for better or worse.  You have been warned.

Balticon 49: A short visit Saturday


Gar and I headed up to Balticon at the venerable Hunt Valley Inn last weekend, for a day visit.  We were a little stymied when we discovered the indie film festival was on Sunday and we went on a Saturday.  Call it faulty memory– maybe we DID go up on Sunday last  year? (yes we did; should have read the online program first)  Oh well, we didn’t let that dim the luster.

Impressions: For starters, B49 seemed very lightly attended.  It wasn’t the standard cheek by jowl situation in the Salon areas, and the usual mob of costumery seemed greatly diminished.  I like Science Fiction conventions quite a bit, but I’ve never been one of the faithful– meaning, I don’t wear costumes, I don’t “filk”, I don’t wear a lot of buttons.  So SF Con Fandom isn’t really my thing– I’m not part of that culture.   I read books, and I like SF authors, and like to hear them talk, and I buy books.  So that’s what I come to a convention for– and maybe see indie films and play some games.   In that respect, we were only partially successful, but that’s fine.

There were two writer GOH’s I wanted to see, Chuck Gannon and Jack McDevitt, but I missed both.  I did buy a book of each of theirs however.  FireFall by Gannon and the reissue of The Hercules Text from McDevitt.

The Con Suite was a big disappointment.  The munchies budget was clearly halved.  No WiFi signal in the Con Suite, which was very annoying.  Still, it’s a nice place to collect and plan our precious hours, so we mapped out our day.  I went to the Dealer’s area and bought some books from vendors who I don’t normally see on Amazon.  I also made a point of buying three books from the late great C.J. Henderson, whom I liked and will miss.  C.J.’ s wife and family incurred lots of expense in the final stages of his illness so every little bit helps.    I also sat in on his memorial service at the convention.  I certainly hope C.J.’s work remains in print and someone (not necessarily his wife) continues selling his titles.

I didn’t hit every panel talk I wanted to– I went to a Pulp discussion that was notionally about C.J.’s work but ranged far and wide, and was very engaging.  I enjoyed it.  I followed that up with dropping in to see a little of the anime film Princess Mononoke but as I  A) had seen this film multiple times and B) was falling asleep in the back, much to my son’s embarrassment, I nipped out to the next talk, which was on the Ancient Art of Celestial Navigation and Land-Finding, as practiced by Polynesians.   This was very interesting indeed.    The professor (a public scholar from the Smithsonian Institution Museum of the Native Americas) was a great speaker and projected his enthusiasm for the subject to his rapt audience.  A very fortuitous find.  After that, we were hungry, so we went to Wegman’s to get the buffet and make use of the WiFi.

Since we were at sixes and sevens not being able to make the Film Festival unless we spent the night, so I suggested we try Mr. John Montrie’s RPG session about Victorian Horror using Howard Whitehouse’s Dashing Adventure rules.  Garrett readily agreed and this activity proved to be the high point of the day.  We were using minimal rules/maximum storytelling approaches to the game– Howard’s rules are very forgiving.   The scenario was pretty cut and dried– we were a team of trouble makers sent to a mansion to investigate the recent ghost sightings reported there.  I played “Biggles” the Pilot, and I played him increasingly skeptical of the events transpiring at the castle.  We played it all the way through to the end, and part of my prediction (that the former owner of the estate was somehow caught up in the hauntings) would come true.  Even if there was a leprechaun.   It was a very satisfying conclusion,and thus we drove homeward, it being elevenish.

Despite a low attendance and a bad con suite, I enjoyed myself and so did Garrett.  We tried something new (RPG games at a convention) and got a decent return for our buck.  There were rumors of Balticon moving into the inner harbor next year– not sure what to make of them.  The only convention I’ve been associated with that tried to go to the Inner Harbor (convention center) ended up losing 30K plus.  I hope the planners have thought of everything.  I’d still be inclined only to do a day trip under those circumstances, and maybe only once, if the parking is too astronomical.  As it tends to be.

So that was my Balticon 49.. kind of a shade of what it once was, but still enjoyable.

Post-Apocalyptic Scooby Gang, in Color!


Creating a post-apocalyptic car combat game has its whimsical moments.  I present “The Scooby Gang”, alongside the Mystery Machine:

L to R: Fred, Velma, Daphne, Shaggy. Mystery Machine (up armored) in background. Scooby is in foreground.

 Figures were Elhiem, the Van is Hot Wheels with some Stan Johansen flourishes..

Same lineup as before, another angle

“1970’s Style Teen/twentys Pesky Kids and Great Dane”

and another new car…

The Grease Palace! He drops oil slicks and junk parts behind him…

Yes, it’s fun living in a blasted Apocalypse, devoid of all hope!

COUP by IoS: Reassessing


I have to admit, I wasn’t much impressed with COUP (the IOS game) when it was announced recently. I will not dwell on the In Game Purchase model, which I think is rather greedy for very little in return– why? Because the game is perfectly playable as a free product. You need never purchase a single other expansion and you can still have fun with it. So it’s kind of hypocritical to complain about the publisher trying to squeeze every last drop out of this turnip. They aren’t requiring you to buy anything.

I was, however, not impressed with COUP as a game– it didn’t seem to capture the concept of bluffing as well as the regular pasteboard version did, and again, my reasoning was based on incomplete information. I have, since, actually played a game of COUP as a card game (loved it!), and

There’s a little chat button, top right, that has a lot of canned statements you can broadcast to other players. Included are statements such as “Play your card already!” and “I have a Captain Card!” or “I have the Duke!” This can play out in a lot of different ways– when you are playing an action associated with a card you don’t have (like drawing taxes as the Duke when you dont’ have that card), and actually SAY “I have the Duke card”.. that is.. actually LYING (read, bluffing), and even if it isn’t anything the other player should give credence to, if he’s smart, it’s still a nice touch. It certainly acts like a fantastic distraction to keep the other guy guessing.

In summary, I’m warming up to the game quickly and actually enjoy playing it. I’m only winning a third of the games I play so there’s a lot to learn.

Road Warrior / White Line Fever update ver 2.2 to 2.4


Just a quick note. RW/WLF has been updated, from version 2.2 to version 2.4. This update covers oil slicks and road debris, and as well as adding the one shot heavy rocket to the arsenal. There are also some rules for limiting the game based on ammunition expenditure and a point-based victory point system (the last two optional appendices).

Anyway, you can find it in the standard places, under DIGITAL RULES on the DIGITAL RULES page. See that handy tab at the top of this page.