Tag Archives: Figures

I’m Using 28mm Reaper Bones figures in Frostgrave


Given that individual pewter figures are getting pretty dear, I thought I’d give Reaper Bones figures a try recently, and although my first results at painting were not to my liking, I did end up developing a method where I arrived at results that I could use.

BONES, if you don’t know, is a line of plastic figures created from REAPER miniature molds.  I have no quibbles with Reaper’s sculpting, it’s almost always top-notch.  However, I don’t much care for the plastic they use– it’s the rubbery kind, not too dissimilar to the plastic used in “Clickie” Collectible figures games.  It wasn’t holding paint very well.  I had heard you could paint them right out the box.  That is incorrect.  Spray priming with Testor’s primer was a bad idea– the figure was tacky/sticky for days afterward.  Don’t do this.   I went back to basics and just soaked the figures overnight in soapy water, and rinsed them off, blotting them and rubbing off and mold release residue.  Then I painted each figure with a thinned coat of some neutral primer color, like base gray.  After drying overnight i mounted them on craft sticks and started painting.  The results were very positive.  There are so many great fantasy personalities in the Bones catalogue that I can add a ton of wizards and fighting men into the mix for a lot cheaper than pewter figures, and they match the Northstar metal ones in scale.

Here are some of the figures I’ve done so far.  Click to enlarge.  I have a man at arms figure (good for specialty infantry types), an Illusionist, a Sigilist (looking very Gandalfian), an Elementalist shooting a fire spell, a very commanding looking Enchanter from the Pathfinder range, a Demonic looking Summoner, and a big Death-dealing looking barbarian.


(Everything)


(L-R Enchanter, Summoner, Barbarian)


(L-R Man at Arms, Illusionist, Sigilist, Elementalist)

That’s about what I have done now.  My painting method seems to be repeatable so I’m going to go with that method for a few more lines.  I also have a small horde of skeletons painted, a couple of demons and other creatures, and now I am getting some mercenaries primed up.

Review — British Napoleonic Peninsular War Flank Company [VX5401]


See previous review of Victrix Napoleonic Voltigeurs 1805-1812

This is a follow up purchase to the Victrix Voltigeurs I picked up last month.  I have been acquiring and painting up 54mm Skirmisher figures for an ancient game I idea I had about man to man skirmishing in the Napoleonic era.   For the game to see fruition I’m going to need a relatively small group of figures from each side (8-10 maximum).  I want to ultimately pit Riflemen versus Voltigeurs from the late war era.  I own and have painted up about 10 of the Italieri 95th Rifles but they are a little largish compared to the Victrix Voltigeurs.  So I picked the British Peninsular Infantry Flank Company box as well.  This makes sense.  The flank company is sculpted and detailed to be a set of light infantry troops, which are sufficiently animated that they would make great skirmish troops.  I would have liked at least a couple of crouching/firing poses but these are probably sculpted to be deployed in formations, not as skirmishers.   No matter.  There’s enough variation in the basic body types that they look pretty animated to me.

Box Cover from Victrix Site

Box Cover

As before there are five or so sprues of various body parts and bodies to create customization with. From what I’m seeing here you can create a maximum of 16 figures from the sprues included. There are two officer figures and a drummer boy as well as several infantry in action or marching.

Group

Group of 5 sample figs: Drummer, Officer, and 3 Infantrymen

Closer: Drummer, Officer, Infantryman

3 infantry poses

I’m going to use the basic redcoat/grey trousers/black shako paint scheme for these guys, as generic late war period infantry British infantry types. Here’s a picture of the Victrix site’s suggested paint scheme:

Suggested paint scheme

Suggested Paint Scheme

The figures out of the box are made of a durable hard style plastic that assembles very quickly with styrene glue (Testors, in this case), which bonds quickly and holds well. Out of the box they are slightly oily, which is probably mold release spray residue. Recommend an overnight soak before painting. Flashing is minimal. There were some mold lines on the sides of the shakos that needed trimming but I found nothing else that required a lot of work– some poses require a little attention while the plastic cement welds are curing.

Though they aren’t exactly cheap (say, compared to Italieri’s molded plastic figures, at about 15 dollars more on average, US retail prices), they are wondrously flexible in their approach to customization. I really like these releases and I certainly plan on buying and building more. I won’t be fielding large armies of these, ever, but they are great value for the money and I enjoy the detail, sculpting and utility of Victrix 54mm scale figures. If this is a scale and period you are interested in, I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Small Wars — Victrix 54mm French Napoleonic Voltigeurs 1805 – 1812 [VX5403]


I have wanted a small group of reasonably detailed looking French Voltigeur figures in 54mm for a while now, and last posted on the subject in 2010.   I tried picking up HaT Voltigeurs but didn’t like either the detailing, the busby, or the style of plastic HaT uses.  It’s too soft.  The sculpts are also small and too thin compared to the figures I’m using for British Riflemen.

Victrix Ltd. has been active in expanding their line greatly in the last few years, and have been primarily producing 28mm hard plastic figures in the Napoleonic era.  In recent years, their 54mm line has increased swiftly.  They still haven’t made a pack of purpose built 95th Riflemen yet, but they have made British Peninsular Flank Infantry Companies which I might find useful.

Victrix also recently released a package of Napoleonic Voltigeurs good for conflicts from 1805 to 1812.  This is essentially a set of pieces– bodies without arms or heads, but molded with jackets and trousers.  A selection of arms in a multitude of poses.  Usually a left arm holding a musket.  Separate backpacks and bayonet frogs.    A variety of right hand poses, allowing an extensive level of customization for the finished figures.   Each box has 16 possible figures, with the possibility of 10 figure groups– there are two shako types– one with the tall pom pom, the other with the short, and two bare heads.  There are two “officer” bodies with a nicer uniform and a coat over one shoulder at a jaunty angle.

Voltigeurs were Imperial light skirmishing style troops, and I am painting up the high-pom pom variant shakos for individual bases for the skirmish game I’ve been planning in a desultory fashion over the years.   So I have created the 2 bare headed chaps as leaders (a veteran sergeant and an officer) and all the high pompom Voltigeurs into a 8 figure skirmishing band, which should match my rifleman figures nicely.

As for quality, I’m very much impressed..  each Victrix figure I construct is significantly different from the other.  My only complaint being that I could only make TWO firing positions from this package!  However, there are many other possibilities from the arms and musket poses that are left, and since the loading of a musket is a series of steps, it actually works to have multiple custom poses of the Voltigeurs fiddling with their muskets.  Indeed, the game design I’m working with will be focusing on the firing and loading process as a multistep action, so it’s all entirely appropriate.

Last night, I assembled what I had left, which was six extra figures with the smaller pompom shako types.  I like these so much, I’m going to paint them up too, just with a slightly different Voltigeur uniform.

54mm Voltigeurs from Victrix.

Officer figure and two Voltigeur figures Closeup

More Voltigeurs, Closeup

I’m VERY pleased with Victrix 54mm figures, and I expect I’m going to buy some English and other nationalities as they become available. Keep up the good work, Victrix!