The Passing of S. Craig Taylor


Flat Top, Avalon Hill era

Word has filtered in, via Yahoogroup and Facebook, of the passing of Craig Taylor.  This is third hand from Bob Coggins (who worked with Craig on Napoleon’s Battles):

“Bob Coggins asked me to let everyone know that S. Craig Taylor passed away this week. Cause of death was undetermined at this time, but will be available later, I’m sure. Bob’s computer is down at the moment so he will not be able to respond to any questions on line. We will let everyone know more details as they become available. Craig was a prolific and successful miniatures and board game historical rules writer and co-author of Napoleon’s Battles. I’ve known him since his Avalon Hill days when I was one of the staff playtesters on Avalon Hill’s version of the Australian Napoleonic game “Empires in Arms,” which Craig shepherded through the redesign effort and publication. His integrity and willingness to go the extra mile in game development was well known. He was an amazing game designer and developer with a long list of titles to his credit. The hobby has lost a true professional, a true friend. He will be missed.”

I can only echo Bob’s sentiments.  S. Craig Taylor was a creative giant and astute businessman, the mind behind designs that were revolutionary in their day and still played today: Wooden Ships and Iron Men, Napoleon’s Battles, Flat Top, Air Force, half of Macchiavelli, Sergeants!, Ship o’ the Line, half of Naval War, Development on Empires in Arms,.. Craig, along with Steve Peek, was one of the two men behind the Yaquinto Game company, which brought us classic games such as Swasbuckler, Armor, Battle and my favorite, Ironclads.

I wasn’t great friends with Craig but I have met and talked with him on several occasions at shows, from long ago ORIGINS to more recent HISTORICONS, where he was present manning the booth for his more recent venture, Lost Battallion Games.  For a guy who had such a deep impact on the wasting of my time (via WS&IM, Apache, Yaquinto Games of Various kinds, Napoleon’s Battles and Flat Top, even Ship of the Line, which I was playing with miniatures in the early 80s), I never got the impression that he thought his output was anything special.  He was always very easygoing, approachable and good humored when I talked to him.  I’ll miss Craig,  a talented designer and a gentle soul.  R.I.P. Craig Taylor.

Swashbuckler, Yaquinto Era

Can’t find a good picture of Craig in my files or on the interwebs, so I’m just putting covers of favorite games up in this post.  Our hobby will certainly less without you, Craig

Wooden Ships and Iron Men, Avalon Hill Era

Related:

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

3 responses to “The Passing of S. Craig Taylor

  1. Greg Sigler

    Met Craig at AH in baltimore around 1977. Was friendly albeit not happy about my questions but willing to chat no matter his schedule. Every game of his I own is very good indeed.

  2. This is very sad. That’s two people whose games I love gone in such a short time–well, maybe Doug Smith wasn’t a gaming great but he produced some spectacular stuff for the computer sim RAILWORKS TRAIN SIMULATOR 2012. Both Smith and Taylor had stuff on my “shortlist” of stuff I absolutely must have with me on a desert island.

    RIP Mr Taylor.

  3. Worked with Craig at Avalon Hill for some years, and again during his short stint at MicroProse. He was a brilliant game designer, a fine historian, and a proponent of the melding of the two. He was also a friend, and spent many a Thnaksgiving with my family over the years. One of my fondest memories was him helping my kids stack firewood one of those times. We’ll miss him … the passing of an icon in our hobby and industry.

    Rex A. Martin