Category Archives: wargame

Wargame Bloggers Quarterly–a Neat New Magazine


misternizz:

I don’t often reblog a post, but Wargame Blogger’s Quarterly is such a neat idea, I’m really taken with it. A big tip of the chapeau to Thomo for finding this and I’ll definitely be investigating it in the future (and who knows, maybe something from here will be on there, but I doubt it!).

Originally posted on Thomo's Hole:

Wargamers_Quarterly

It’s big, bold and pretty!

There is a new quarterly wargames magazine available in the Internet called Wargame Bloggers Quarterly. This is, as the title suggests, a quarterly magazine designed to highlight the best looking of games and and reviews.

I have had a quick look through issue one and I am impressed. No fancy tricks, just good solid text and images.

This first issue has chapters on:

  • Bloody Cremona from Simon Miller
  • Trouble Brewing in “Serenity City” by Dave Docherty
  • Whitechapel 1888 by Michael Awdry
  • Lledo “Days Gone Bye” Horse Drawn Carriages from Robert Audin
  • Inside the Mind of Loki – Vallejo Model Colour and Triads from Andrew “Loki” Saunders
  • Iron Mitten Plays “Spot the Royalist”
  • and lastly, a copy of the Official Charter of the Magazine

Well worth having a look – I know what my lunchtime reading is today … and tomorrow!

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Game Camp 2014, Day Three: BDB Quest for the ORB Pt. 2


On Wednesday, we played out the rest of the Orb of Power scenario for Big Danged Boats. It was a very frenetic game, with lots of odd stuff happening that tested BDB’s boundries. Big Danged Boats is a design that’s hard not to tinker with, and I’ve been working on ways to speed it up a little. I like the combination of shooting, boarding, fighting and magic that I’ve developed so far. It’s a good mix, but I designed to build a narrative, a story, and it’s not the most speedy game ever. On the other hand, it’s a lot of laughs. What other universe has Squid Gods, Dead god’s feet, and Armored Cheeses?

HIGHLIGHTS FROM TODAY

The Iron Dwarf player (Spence) came to grief early today. The Plunger took many hits from the tower and eventually was uncrewed. The Damage track also went to critical, and a severe engine failure was the result, requiring two turns of Wrenching to fix.

The guys wanted to run it through to the finish. The idea of allying together against a third party seemed to be an anathema to some and other players took to it. One side of the board was Chaos with ships shooting at each other and backstabbing galore. The other side was like an exercise in barter economy– Reed (playing Battenburg, who had bought a ton of reinforcements) traded off Slingers for Gold, Gnomes for Gold, and generally acted like a capitalist. The Wood Elves, the Karstark Gnomes, and the Little People Brigade all acted in close concert with each other, made deals, made room for each other to pass and navigate around each other. So it all looked like they were on board with the “Fighting Gordon the Enchanter” thing.

The Red Menacer charged to the assistance of the Plunger, and managed to get two Dwarf Marines on board to Wrench on the broken crank propeller. Unfortunately, the Seng were sailing through in an incorporeal state and a traffic jam might have ensued if he were “solid”.

The Seng sailed THROUGH the Dwarf ships in incorporeal state. On the other side, the Augmentation price for the spell ran out and Patrick wasn’t willing to pay any more gold to keep it alive. So the Wizard was going to go up in a nimbus of blue flame, but Patrick booted him out of the ship at the last second. “Nice job, Wiz, SEE YA!” BOOM!

The O.R.C. immolates themselves in revolutionary martyr fashion!

The Orcish Revolutionary Council (O.R.C.) performed in revolutionary martyr spirit. They sailed right at the front door of the Tower, as if to ram. One of the Martyrs tried to ram the front door but got caught up in melee, and pulled the “Stupid” result from the Red Badge of Courage, and so ran around the tower base instead of self-immolating.. The next martyr managed to impale the aquatic mine with his pump charge, and a disastrous explosion took place.

About mid game the tone of the game changed and the knives started to come out. The Little People Brigade boarded the Von Ripper of the Iron Dwarves. Amazingly they didnt’ choose to eat the Holy Mushrooms and transform into Gnogres. And they won! Those are some tough Gnomes!!

The Alliances that were in place at the start of the game started to fall apart. The Karstark Gnomes turned on the Iron Dwarves. The Bone Brigade, which had been shot to pieces in its ill conceived attack of the previous day, scrapped with the Foot of the Dead God and the Primus, starting the day off with a nasty event card on the Cult and exploding their one and only artillery piece, which angered them to no end. Primus fought with the Bone Brigade at a distance, and he retaliated with every missile weapon he has at his disposal, wiping out most of the BB. The Bone Brigade player (Cameron) didn’t understand the impact of talking smack one turn during an ambush, and then begging for an alliance the next. The Seng managed to board and capture the Plunger, and operate it (clumsily) to spar torpedo the Blue Magoo from the Little People Brigade, doing severe damage.

The Seng could only operate the Plunger slowly and clumsily, being man-sized and trying to operate a Dwarf-sized submarine.

The other successful boarding of the day, The Von Ripper, under new Gnome management.

The cult of F’Vah pulled out their big trump card, Summoning the Squid God, and it was hideously effective.

Goodbye, Black Galley! And suddenly, it was no more!

The Bone Brigade was a shambles– shot to pieces by the Rats and Cultists, and missing one ship to the Squid God, but they bounced back playing the Faction card: Surprise, They’re already dead! which brought back 5 skeletons to life, so at least the Deadnought fought its way clear of the mess.

And the Rat Men managed to at land a small lodgment at the bottom of the tower..

And then the allies on the far end, the Rat Men and the Cultists, fell out when the Cultists turned on them like a prison punk in the showers.

The Cultists hit the Rats with the Squid God, and destroyed the Primus…

By the end of the day, the game was left still not resolved, so the fellows requested at least another session in the morning.

Here’s the Slide Show of today’s FUN!

The Union Forever! The Battle of Mobile Bay


Leo Walsh ran a 1:1200 scale game of the Battle of Mobile Bay on Saturday night at HISTORICON.  The rules were AGE OF IRON.    I jumped in and ran a small line of 90 day gunboats and double-ender style ships.

The UNION FOREVER!!

Most people know the Battle of Mobile Bay as the “one where Admiral Farragut said Damn the Torpedoes, full speed ahead“.. and (perhaps) that’s true.  There was a lot more to Mobile Bay than a few jingoistic slogans, of course.  Mobile Bay was one of the last great sheltered ports of the Confederacy, and as long as it was not thoroughly blockaded, the South could run blockade runners in and out with impunity.  So a Union victory at Mobile Bay would have strategic consequences for both sides.

Admiral Farragut’s plan was to attack Mobile Bay in two lines, with the ironclads closest to the local fort (Fort Morgan) where their armored sides would withstand the heavy siege gun fire, and the Wooden ships lashed together with the weakest ones outside the range of fire. The Confederates also set up a line of aquatic mines (torpedoes) that had the effect of forcing the ships to pass in front of the fort’s guns.  We considered that idea, then went for the idea of FOUR lines.

The miniature terrain, such as it was, followed the historical layout reasonably closely, although the OOB was greatly expanded from the original. In addition there was the CSS Tennessee, one other (ahistorical) casemate that started farther out in the bay and was pretty slow to engage. There were four other medium to small gunboats with sizable ordinance on the other side of the barrier.

Union Forces closer up

Originally our attack plan was going to be three lines, with the ironclads protecting the more valuable screw frigates, like the Hartford and the Richmond. Leo told us that would not keep the frigates from getting hull hits, so we spread the line out over four lines– the ironclads closest to the fort, the screw frigates in two lines, and the lighter 90 day gunboats and double-enders in line farthest from the fort. I offered to take that line over the line of mines (torpedoes) that was funneling ships towards the guns of the fort. My idea was that the lighter ships going over the torpedo line would offer a huge distraction to the Confederate gunboats on the other side of the barrier.

I’m in charge of the rickety ships on the right hand side.

If it worked for Farragut, it might work for me. I managed to slip my first two ships over the barrier with no difficulty. We engaged with 3 gunboats of varying sizes on the far side of the torpedo barrier. We were using Age of Iron, which is a pretty good rule set, providing a mix of history and playability. I’ve played with them before, though not in a long time. The rules certainly address differences in armor, ship sizes and and ship aspect. I had a surprisingly lethal exchange with two Confederate gunboats, one of which was pretty tiny and hard to hit, but as I got more and more ships over the barrier, it became obvious to the Confederate that the was stuck, cut off between a line of pilings that will rip out their hull and my line of gunboats.

Sometimes the “stupid strategy” is stunningly successful

One interesting thing about those supposedly weak 90 day gunboats and double enders: put enough of them in a line, and they throw out a tremendous weight of iron at a single target. When the second Confederate ironclad showed up, my line of gunboats laid into him, ship after ship, and in one turn he suffered from 4 armor hits and 6 hull hits, and was on fire. That’s pretty good for some wooden boats! Contrast that to the line of Screw Frigates that shot past the fort and engaged the Tennessee. We lost two of them, the Brooklyn and the Richmond, due to gunfire exchanges with the Fort and the Tennessee. I lost two ships from my line, the Metacomet (lost to gunfire) and the last ship in my line, the Port Royal, finally hit a mine and sank.

Victory!

Leo’s victory conditions were basically “Sink all Confederate ships”.. and by 1100 PM it looked like we were on the way to doing that. The Tennessee was pretty shot up, and couldn’t turn very quickly, so wouldn’t be able to engage again during the time span of the game. The other (ahistorical) ironclad very likely wouldn’t have survived another turn at the rate it was receiving punishment.

So, a Union naval victory, Huzzah~! Perhaps not as complete as the historical one, but we had more ships engaged, and were facing more Confederates, too. I had a lot of fun with this game and hope to play Age of Iron again very soon.

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WARLORD Soldiers and Strategy


WARLORD Soldiers and Strategy

You knew it had to happen sooner or later.

Added to Digital Rules: Warriors of Mars (TSR) in Epub


Quick announcement:

Visit the DIGITAL RULES page (tab up top) to get a copy

I’ve added TSR’s old WARRIORS OF MARS rpg/skirmish game/sourcebook for Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Barsoom stories.  Warriors of Barsoom was written by Gary Gygax and Brian Blume in 1974. I found the PDF for this game, quite by accident, on Archive.org, so I’m assuming the original owners have no concerns about free distribution, but will gladly take it down if TSR/Wizards/Hasbro squawks about it.   Somehow I don’t think they’ll get all that upset about it.  There’s an EPUB version on Archive as well, but it’s pretty bad– clearly someone ran a conversion script and didn’t clean up the file afterward.  I pretty much had to recreate it from scratch, which was a chore!  Visit the digital rules page if you are interested.

A simple method to use hidden information in Miniature games


Well, simple if you have a tablet with a camera and a photo editor app, that is.
Say you are running a miniature wargame with lots of hidden information in it, like the location of snipers, minefields, ambushes, “hot zones” etc.  This can be problematic in the normal “God’s eye view” of a miniature battlefield.  I’ve seen various ways of hiding hidden movement in plain sight, or tracking it off the battlefield, with various degrees of success.   I’ve tried this recently, and it works perfectly.

Say you have a battlefield laid out, or you are about to.. just one little detail.  You ask the defending player– “where are the hidden units?”

Then take a picture of the battlefield using your tablet camera, like so:

Map 1: the battlefield. The defender needs to set up a minefield, a sniper and an ambush.

Quick like a bunny, switch to a photo editor of some kind that allows fast edits and saves, and where you can use your finger for a stylus.

I use “AVERY” but there are a lot of photo editors out there.

Then, bring it up in an editor, hand it to the defending player, and have him mark the actual photograph with edits showing where this stuff is on the map. He knows where it will be, but the assaulting player will not.. until he encounters it.

Map 2: Marked up with hidden points. Mine field on left, sniper, bottom left. Ambush point, top center.

SAVE out and use it as a reference when the action starts.

Sure, that’s absurdly easy. Easy and fast is good when you have people waiting to start playing! Total time elapsed, less than five minutes.

EDIT: LordAshram from the Miniatures Page suggests, and I concur, that you make a picture for each hidden map feature, so you can only depict a single hidden map feature at a time. In the example above, there would be a minefield map, a sniper map, and an ambush map. Easy enough to do– and you wouldn’t have the pain in the neck of showing ONE thing on the photograph and trying to hide the other things with your hand or a piece of paper.

the Wargaming Rules EPUB Project, a small collection


NOTE, read first: this post is going to get very unwieldy if I keep adding file links and cover images to it, and also a lot harder to find as I continue to post here and it gets buried.  Therefore, I’m adding this content to a PAGE called Digital Rules.  See the tab up at top there?  Go there for Epub wargame rules.  Got it?  Otherwise, there’s the direct link.  Thanks!

First of all, I must tender apologies for not posting in a while.  I haven’t had the mojo and have been more concerned about my workaday world job than my hobby.  So it goes.

Secondly, I’ve been playing with SIGIL lately, the Epub editor that Google recently acquired and are distributing on one of their Google Code pages.  I’m finally satisfied that I’ve found a decent editor that can clean up sloppy Epub conversions.  Sigil does an excellent job and has tons of features.

Looking around the various resources on the internet, there have been plenty of free, good rule sets available over the years.  Mostly these get distributed as PDFs, webpages (HTML) and sometimes text files.  EPUB and MOBI formats are becoming the gradual standard in digital publishing for mobile platforms, and is even showing up as a format for distributing rule sets, as I reported in March of last year.  I think this is a great trend– I’ve been running games using only an Ipad lately– which works if the game isn’t TOO complicated.

That had me thinking.. there’s a ton of older, established easy rule sets that have been hanging out in various corners of the web here and there for decades, almost.  As a learning experience, I’ve downloaded a few and converted them in various ways– text to epub, html to epub, pdf to epub, etc.  Then I’ve gone back in in Sigil to tidy up the resulting mess.  It’s time consuming (especially for games with lots of tables), but anyone with a little XHTML experience can do it.   So I’m going to start making a few of these projects available as I create them, figuring that somebody somewhere with a table or other device might find them useful for gaming.

The first two are A HOTTER FIRE, a simple ACW Ironclad game by Alan Saunders and available on the Staines Wargame Group website.  The other is RENCOUTER, a simple skirmish game by Ed Allen that’s been on Web-Grognards.com for almost fifteen years.   The last is THE FOUR EYED DOG IS DEAD, another great Staines wargame club game, this time on the Taiping Rebellion.  I didn’t request permissions to do this, but I figure my efforts to be just another version of an established web presence for these files, and in keeping with the designer’s desires to distribute his work freely.  So I hope the authors don’t get to waspish about it.  If you are the creator of anything I post and have the slightest issue with an epub conversion, contact me and I’ll take it off the website immediately.  On the gripping hand, if you want me to convert something of yours, contact me and I’ll see if it is a good candidate.

If you want to get a copy, click on the cover pictures to access the raw epub files.

Click on A HOTTER FIRE cover to download the rules epub

Click on RENCOUNTER cover to download the rules epub

Click to download the EPUB to The FOUR EYED DOG IS DEAD. Taiping Rebellion Rules by the Staines Wargaming Group

Note: Four Eyed Dog has a Quick Reference Sheet HERE as a separate file and a set of Order Counters on the source page.  Since these are “print once and done” files designed to be printed out, I didn’t jam them into an Epub, where they would be somewhat useless.

2/7/2014 Update:
I may end up moving these to a page on this blog, rather than just this post.  In any event, here’s MUNERA SINE MISSIONE, one of my favorite simple gladiator sets by Mr. Alan Saunders of Stronghold & Staines Wargame Group fame.  I like his work.

Click to download Munera rules in Epub format.

09 Feb Update:

I’ve moved the content to the DIGITAL RULES page.  See the tab above.

Enjoy! Let me know how these work out for you. I plan on converting more. I’m likely to create epub files for my own THE MAGI and BIG DANGED BOATS.

Possible future projects will be VIKING LOOTERS, my new man to man Nappy game, and maybe some decent civil war land battle rules. Suggestions welcomed– the criteria being they shouldn’t be too complex, have too many tables and pages and are light on the illustrations.

Have fun and enjoy the game.

Sample page

An example from A HOTTER FIRE, being read in IBooks, on an IPad Air tablet. Pagination isn’t 100% perfect! The file is readable and if care is taken with the table of contents, fairly easy to navigate.

DISCLAIMER. I did the best I could with what I had, but some of the times, a table will carry over to the next page or the pagination isn’t 100% clean. I’m not responsible for the consequences of loading epubs on your tablet. Use at your own risk.

DRIVE ON MOSCOW by Shenandoah Studios, Preview


“After three months of preparations, we finally have the possibility to crush our enemy before the winter comes. All possible preparations were done…; today starts the last battle of the year..” — Adolph Hitler on Operation Typhoon, Völkischer Beobachter, 10 October 1941.

I had opportunity to get a preview of DRIVE ON MOSCOW lately and have already taken it out for a couple of test drives. Drive on Moscow is volume 2 in the “Crisis in Command” series of two player war games that started with Battle of the Bulge. It will cost 9.99 and the release date is 21 November, 2013. Players can play asynchronously, via hotseat, or against the AI.

Drive on Moscow, in case you’ve been secluding yourself under a rock, is the follow on to the wildly successful Battle of the Bulge, by Shenandoah Studios. Shenandoah Studios is helmed by ex-SPI and VG Staffers Eric Lee Smith and Nick Karp. Their company is doing their best to bring real wargames to the Ipad format, and last year’s Bulge has set an industry standard.

Main Menu, Drive on Moscow

Drive on Moscow is based upon a Ted Racier design. The game plays out the very tip of the spearhead of Operation Barbarossa in 1941, when German forces were halted within sight of the city of Moscow. Barbarossa was Germany’s first and best chance at winning the war in the East; they came within a hair’s breadth of success. After 1941, the German forces would suffer attrition at an alarming rate and never again enjoy the numbers they had attacking Moscow in 1941. The Soviets, by contrast, start out somewhat weak and disorganized strategically and only gain in strength as the days and weeks pass and Soviet Russia’s phenomenal manpower and industrial resources come into play. Drive on Moscow features area movement and an identical game engine to the Bulge game. There are many similarities, but many differences. For one thing, the scale is much larger. Players now attack with Panzer Corps and defend with Soviet Shock armies. In Bulge, the player plays the role of a harassed area commander, either trying to stave off disaster by funneling reinforcements to weak points, or a very understrength attacker, trying for an breakthrough before the faltering supply chain gets compromised. In Moscow, the player steps into the shoes (or jackboots?) of Army commanders the like of Guderian, Von Beck and Zhukov. Units are larger and have greater staying power.

The situation at start. Piece of cake, right?

Above is the basic scenario. There are victory objectives on the map, as there were in Bulge, but very clearly labelled. Of course, the plum is Moscow (top left).

The German player, will enjoy early success, as he has several panzer corps to use as his spearhead. A reasonably proficient player should be able to break through the Soviet line, especially on the left. That can be where the problems start, however.

Clearing space in the road to Moscow

The Soviets will have more and more infantry to throw into the equation and any spearhead at the gates of Moscow will soon find itself isolated by lots of annoying infantry armies and some very good tank armies rapidly popping in out of nowhere. So German attacks must be supported if they have any chance to make it to the big city. The unit mix is roughly the same, adding in railway (strategic) movement, cavalry and airborne troops which are very handy inded for the defender.

Victory is decisive and easy to understand– it’s not all about capturing Moscow.  There are multiple strong points all over the map that the Soviets will fanatically defend.  If the Axis player captures one, victory points are given for the initial capture of a strong point and more for each turn it is held; the initial bonus is lost if the Soviets recapture it. So it’s safe to say that the Germans should attack the named VP areas as long as possible and not lose a lot of time worrying about the open countryside where they won’t gain anything and lose both units and time in costly battles.

Setup Screen

Although the engine and general look and feel are very similar to Bulge, the scale and situation are very different. For one thing, Drive on Moscow just seems more colorful and bright! It must be the muted color palette that the graphic artists at Shenandoah Studios used for Battle of the Bulge, but that game always makes me think I’m playing at night– I much prefer Moscow’s big, bright maps, with clearly marked objectives, railroad movement, and wide open areas. Though I’d play either game, any day.

The New Game’s map and units

I’m only 3 games into Drive on Moscow, so consider this a preview. I’ve only played the AI opponent so far; it seems fairly competent but will cluster around the strong point VP areas after you break through the first defensive line, or at least has in the last 3 games. That’s roughly historical, I suppose. The game has elements of the Bulge experience; one side disorganized and nearly paralyzed at first (see: Stalin’s Command Paralysis, which is part of the game), the other ruthless and efficient, but at the end of a very long supply chain, and with no slack in the timetable of conquest. However, the differences become evident after the first play– railroad movement, and the terrain the map is representing, has very different consequences and outcomes. Drive on Moscow is in every way a fantastic sequel to Battle of the Bulge and will provide wargamers of varying levels of experience and competence endless hours of fun.

I strongly recommend DRIVE ON MOSCOW, which will be in the Itunes App store this week.

X-Wing Customizable Magnetic / Pivoting Flight Stand


misternizz:

A very cool post on Pen and Lead about Customizable Magnetic/Pivoting Flight stands. Being able to demonstrate an angled curved turn really adds a certain visual something to X-WIng Miniatures games.

Originally posted on Pen and Lead:

So, like so many other people, I purchased Fantasy Flight’s new X-Wing miniatures game and purchased all of the expansions thus far.  I am of course, waiting on the new expansions coming out soon.

When playing the game, I wanted a little bit more dynamic “pose” to the ships, and being familiar with flight stands that allow you to rotate and change the pitch and yaw of the mini, I thought I could make my own.   I posted a short video at the end of this post of the finished product.

I made a trip to our local Wal-Mart and purchased some BBs in the air gun section as well as some pellets.  You have to find the right type that are attracted to magnets.  The BBs you see in the image are steel while the pellets I bought aren’t attracted to magnets, so they are useless.

So, what…

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Getting a few 1:600 ironclads off of the back burner


Work in progress; Painting up some Union Ironclads and scenery bits I picked up at a Christmas Sale from Brookhurst Hobbies last year… The Tuscumbia (r) and Benton (l). I’m redoing the decks, I’m not satisfied how they turned out. 1:600 scale, Peter Pig Range 7 line. These are decent resin models, not the best manufacturer on this subject and scale, but I like the Range 7 stuff– they make very affordable resin cast dockyards and forts.

I don’t have a lot of historical sources for how either ship looked, exactly. It’s clear that the paddlebox on the Tuscumbia was painted from the photographs I’ve seen, so I made her a cheerful bright blue (then grimed it up with a wash). Ditto for the Benton. An 1880ish colored drawing shows her with a blue paddlebox, so I gave her a nice bright blue one just to liven her up a bit. Otherwise the casemate is gun metal with a heavy armor wash (to give it that grimey look). The wooden decks are a Desert Armor camoflauge color that I stained with a light brown ink. It ran a little and looks dirty in spots, so I’ll either repaint it or give it a lighter highlight to look weathered. Finishing touches: considering adding rigging wire to both ships and boats on davits on the Benton. We’ll see.

Benton and Tuscumbia

Benton (left) Tuscumbia (right). Both models from Peter Pig.

Next step: painting up some remote detonating water mine markers (called “Torpedoes” back in the day), some markers for damage, submarines and gunboats, and a largish pier for riverine civil war scenarios.

2013 Game Camp Day 2: Magi Round 2 and X-Wing Miniatures


Tuesday was a good day.  Due to popular request, I ran The Magi again for a second day.  This was a much faster game than the first one as there was less stuff for the players to figure out.  It was, however, the day that everyone got enamored with casting the Summon Elemental spell, which will require an edit, I think.  It’s much too powerful as written.

the Magi and Elementals in play

Fink the Wrathful casts his second Ice Elemental; in the background Weenus Bitterkins casts a Fire Elemental to destroy both of them.

BATTLE OF THE MAGI

The Wizards Fink the Wrathful, Jenna Greywind and Weenus Bitterkins were the standouts in this contest.  Sadly, my character, Fizban the Fabulist, got a face full of two ice storms in a row and died rather quickly once the Ice Elemental was cast.  It was  a great game that saw Jenna Greywind as the last Wizard standing.

Millenium Falcon cruises by

Who invited HIM?? (Click to see Slideshow)

After a quick gobbled lunch we set up X-Wing Miniatures, using the aforementioned new star map I made on Sunday. X-Wing isn’t a game to give a lot of people mental shakes but it is a tad more complex than what the campers had encountered so far; however, everyone liked it.. even if one or two complained that it was harder to understand. I think the game is elegant as written; the mechanics enhance the great theme and the ships interact together very nicely. The subtle differences between ships were far more acute in this multiplayer game than the one on one contests I have enjoyed up to now. I think the investment in the game paid off at this camp– I had more than enough ships for everyone and the game was stunning and visual.

X Wing Game Tuesday afternoon

The game was more or less a tie, but with an edge to the Imperium, running one Tie Advanced (piloted by Vader) and 5 regular Tie Fighters. The Rebels ran two A-Wings, 2 Y-Wings and 1 X-Wing (Skywalker). The special powers of Vader and some of the Tie pilots were decisive in a game where one extra dice roll can be life or death.

Second day in a row of running two games back to back. Tomorrow Gar will run Cosmic Encounters while I set up a big game of BIG DANGED BOATS.

and as always, a BIG THANKS to Wargames Factory LLC, who donated figures for us to paint!

Here’s a more direct thank you from the kids themselves!

Guidebook for HISTORICON 2013 available for download


The HISTORICON 2013 Guidebook app is NOW available for download as of 6:30 this evening. 7/11/13.  Follow instructions below.

The HISTORICON 2013 LANDING PAGE is here:
http://guidebook.com/g/3vcidah7

There’s directions on how to load it on your phone there.

The Historical Miniatures Gaming Society (HMGS) is holding our annual Summer convention, HISTORICON, on 18-21 July 2013.  You can get in a big chunk of miniatures/SF/Historical tabletop gaming at this convention, and the Guidebook can help.

Just like before every con I make one of these for, this post is a short introduction to Guidebook, how to get it and how to use it for YOUR convention.

The screens are a little different on my Ipad, but the basic functions are the same no matter what platform you are using.  Don’t mind all the Cold Wars 2013 pictures and references, the information is essentially the same– I’m too lazy to take a bunch of pictures again for no good reason.

Front Page of the Ipad layout. The Menu is up the left side.  This is the “General Info” page, with the director’s blurb, address, etc.

First of, what is GUIDEBOOK?  This is an application, or “App” in modern parlance, that resides on a multitude of mobile devices (Ipad, Ipod, Iphone, Android smartphones, Android Tablets, and there’s even a version for browser enabled phones that can access the web).  GUIDEBOOK maintains a master schedule of every thing going on at a convention, Maps where everything is, general information about the convention,  plus maintaining a custom version of your own schedule that keeps a list of all the things you want to do when you go to a convention.. and reminds you when you when it’s time to do it.  Think of it as your, extremely personalized version of the paper program guide that can store on a handy device, beeps you when it’s time to go to the next item on your schedule and keeps a to-do list for you.

This is the Main Schedule page. Note the little color bars on the left hand side of the events? They’re color coded– RED for GAMES, BLUE for Tournaments, GREEN for Seminars, PURPLE for Hobby University, and Black/No Color for Operations

Guidebook is an application for supporting conventions, trade shows and other events by hosting a version of their event schedules, layouts, maps, and special data lists on a variety of portable platforms– notably the Apple IoS products Iphone, Ipod TouchIpad, any Android phone, and any internet enabled phone that can web-browse.  In essence, Guidebook takes the important stuff out of the paper program book you all know and love and puts it on a device you may carry around with you on a regular basis.

INDIVIDUAL BANNERS:
Each event on the schedule has a banner associated with it.  This will display on the top of the item you are looking at and everyone can see it.  These individual banners fall in the general groupings of GAMES (run by GMs), TOURNAMENTS, HOBBY UNIVERSITY, SEMINARS (programs) and OPERATIONS (general situational awareness stuff about hours of operations).  Individual look like this:


Any tournament game, including DBA, FoW, FoG, etc.

Press Conferences, Podcast events and Seminars

Nuts and bolts of the Convention.. when areas like the flea market open and close

Hobby University events

Regularly scheduled games

(A selection of event banners)

Directions on how to get and use GUIDEBOOK

The various links associated with these instructions are located on Guidebook’s GET THE APP webpage

Maps Page. Scroll right and left in the blue bar. Every room at the venue we are using is here, laid out for the convention.

Here’s some screenshots of individual event listings in each category

A GAME event
Selecting an event to put on your personal schedule, and the length of the alarm notification

If you have an Ipod Touch, Iphone, or Ipad 1 or 2, visit the Itunes App Store, for the Guidebook app.  Download it. Install it.  It’s free.  Then “Search for events” and located HISTORICON 2013.  Download that guide.   There you go, that’s all you need to do.  Start browsing and bookmarking events you want to go to.

If you have an ANDROID phone, go to the Google Play store or some other outlet for Android OS apps.  Look up GUIDEBOOK. Download the app.  It’s free. Then “Search for events” and located HISTORICON 2013.  Download that guide, and browse away.

Vendor list in the new layout
This is our vendor listing. It’s pretty simple.

If you have an INTERNET CAPABLE, but not Android or IoS phone, you can point your phone’s browser to this web link: http://m.guidebook.com  You will see a less graphical interface but it will contain the same amount of information as the other two platforms (IoS and Android).  Even nicer, when you use a web browser phone, it doesn’t count against our download limit.

I just sent the guidebook in to Guidebook.com, and it is currently being proofread by the Guidebook technical folks for final release and download.

ONCE YOU HAVE THE APP INSTALLED (Somewhere)

  1. Open it.  Do a “Search for Guidebooks”
  2. Find: HISTORICON 2013.  (they list them chronologically)
  3. Select HISTORICON 2013 for download.  This should take about 5 minutes.
  4. Then open it up.  And enjoy Guidebook Goodness.

Anyway, that should contain everything you want to know for HISTORICON 2013– Gaming Events with maps and table numbers, show hours, location, Exhibitors with table numbers, Tournaments, the works.

IF THE INFORMATION CHANGES, up to and DURING the convention, that will be communicated to me by Bill Rutherford, or some other events person, and I will make the changes on the server, which will be communicated to the users as an update to the Guidebook ready for download.  You don’t have to do anything but hit “yes”.

Have fun, and I hope this is useful for you.  I’ll see you at HISTORICON 2013!

Disclaimers:

I did not program the actual app GUIDEBOOK software, just prepared the HISTORICON 2013 data module for free use.  I’m not an employee of Guidebook.com and don’t get paid to endorse them.  Use at your own risk.

An appreciation: “Col. G. Hairy Haggis, at your service”– aka William Landrum


56000aFacebook catches a lot of slings and arrows from critics these days, mostly about invasion of privacy. The flip side of that coin is that Facebook creates the opportunity to keep in touch with people you haven’t seen in next to never. So it was today, when I noticed this face popping up in my Recent Friends bar in Facebook.  I had forgotten who owned that face.  It was William Landrum, also known as “Colonel Hairy Haggis” on the many hobby bulletin boards he used to frequent, especially the Colonial Wars Yahoogroup.  So I finally said to myself, “why would he be a recent friend on FB?  He never posts anything!”  I’m not sure if Facebook was trying to tell me something, but when I went to his profile page, It turns out Bill passed away, over a year ago, and I had never heard the news from anybody in the multiple hobby communities online.

Colonel Hairy Haggis, as he liked to style himself, was always a consummate gentleman online and very pleasant in person.  He was also an inveterate tinkerer.  Bill had his own dental supply lab that did a lot of custom work for the dentist community were he lived.   He had access to an amazing amount of tools and was fond of casting his own custom toy soldiers or converting existing ones into outlandish creations.

Hairy Haggis in his shop

Hairy Haggis in his shop
More stuff

More stuff

56513c

Back in the late 90s, when I was running a game of my own devising called LE GRAND CIRQUE at conventions, Colonel Haggis was an occasional player and enthusiastic commentator on the game. At one point I created a conveyance called The Dowdmobile, with Elwood P. Dowd of HARVEY fame as the pilot. I didn’t have a giant rabbit to accompany Elwood in his conveyance, so I used the old cop out of “Well, Harvey is invisible, you see…” as my excuse. Colonel Haggis would have none of that. Using a conversion method, he created a giant armed rabbit out of an old Alternative Armies figure. It was fantastic, whiskers and all.  He did that because it “fit”, and he was right.  Bill also participated in my Le Grande Cirque du Wabash game waaay back in Historicon 2000, I think. Those were good times.

Bill Landrum was a wonderful guy; even tempered, creative, funny and a gentleman.  He loved Victorian affectations in speech and manner, and adored Victorian Science Fiction before it became “Steampunk”.   A born storyteller and always up for a joke or ready with a kind word. I wish there were more people in the hobby like Colonel Hairy Haggis. I’ll miss him.

Ebook versions of wargaming rules, new-ish from Osprey


Dux Bellorum on Amazon’s Kindle Store

Osprey Publishing has been a major player in wargame publishing since 2008, when they published Field of Glory, an ancients miniatures rule set from Slitherine.  During that time, I’ve seen more than one reference to PDF versions of their rules online, and they might be legal, but I’m kind of doubting it as they all seem to be listed on torrent download sites.  Heck, I may be wrong, but it just seems not on the up and up– Amazon doesn’t sell a commercial PDF of Field of Glory, for instance.   Since 2008, Osprey has overseen a small explosion of wargaming titles, publishing several high quality hardcover color illustrated rulebooks and expansions– including Ambush Alley, Bolt Action, Tomorrow’s War and several flavors of Field of Glory, including the latest Napoleonic version.  Some of these, depending on Osprey’s relationship with the original company, may be available as PDFs (Tomorrow’s War, for instance, is available as a PDF version).  On another front, there is an even newer line of small, “quirky subject” wargames that appear to be one-offs, and these are starting to hit Amazon as 9.99 Kindle books.  The latest being Dux Bellorum, wargaming in Arthurian England, and The World Aflame, an Interwar Period rules set.  That’s great news.  Why?  Well, mostly a personal preference kind of thing.  PDFs are great for retaining layout and color photographs and the original intent of the author.. but they are bulky beasts when it comes to storage.  I much prefer EPUB when I can get it, as .epub appears to be a platform independent standard these days.  It’s also a very lean standard of publishing.  Most epubs on my Ipad 2 are 1 meg or less.  Most PDFs on my Ipad (the ones with lots of pictures, anyway) are 12 megs or more.  Do the math.  Aha! you say.. Kindle IS a standard.  It uses MOBI files!  Well, yes, certainly.  But anybody with Calibre and Kindle for the PC on their computer can get around that in about five minutes, and load the file as an EPUB, most of the time.
Now, why would we want an electronic version of a rule set on a tablet or E-reader instead of good old dependable paper?  Clearly, the answer depends on the rules.  For something large, hardbound with lots and lots of charts and more importantly, lots and lots of rules exceptions, I probably wouldn’t go paperless for a rule set like that.  For a short, relatively non-complex rules set like the new paperback trade versions being published by Osprey, I embrace the change wholeheartedly.  I ran two games of my own design at Gaming Camp last summer with just the Ipad and some paper roster tables.. I had everything I needed to make the game happen at hand, easy to find and hyperlinked for lookup.  I’d much rather have an Ipad handy for a straightforward, simple game (maybe printing out some cheat sheets for everyone concerned in advance) then toting the rule book around everywhere.  Besides, it makes for some fun reading in the off hours.

A World Aflame at Amazon’s Kindle Store

Osprey, by the by, double tapped me.  I bought both of Dux Bellorum and The World Aflame from them, directly, as paper books first and now just purchased the Kindle/eventually Epub version– and I’ve pre-ordered In Her Majesty’s Name in paper, which will probably have a Kindle version as well.  Great trend, Osprey!  I applaud this.

A little bit of a follow-up: As luck would have it, my PRINTED copy of Dux Bellorum arrived in the mail last night.  A couple of points: Much as I would like to convert my legally purchased copy of the Kindle version of DB to Epub for use on my Ipad, I can’t.   Wargames published by Osprey appear to be DRM protected.  And, no, I have no intention of doing anything illegal, so it looks like I’ll be reading these rules on the Kindle app on my Ipad henceforth.  Secondly, there are some limitations to the Kindle version of the rules.  As any wargamer can attest to, a wargame has plenty of tables.  The conversion has to do tables right to be useful as a resource for GMs.  My reaction is.  yeahhhhhh sorta.  The alignment was a bit messed up and the tables in the DB rules overran the margin a few times.  Still, it was readable and I didn’t lose any information, per se, I just had to swipe left and right to see the stuff outside the margins.   The DB rules are primarily black and white (printed) with some color plates and minis photos.  The printed layout was not replicated like it could be in a PDF, but it was still readable and useful.  So overall I’m not unhappy about purchasing rules via Kindle.

SAGA: More than one way to skin a cat, if that’s your idea of a good time.


You know, sometimes a solution to a problem will stare you right in the face, and you can’t see it. When I mentioned my DIY attempts to make dice for SAGA to a fellow SAGA fan, he pointed out I was taking too direct an approach to the problem. “Oh? What do YOU do?”, I asked. I won’t go to far into the details, lest I anger the good people at Tomahawk studios, but I will let a picture tell a thousand words or something to that effect.

No, I won’t go into how and I’m not going to distribute this. I own SAGA outright and these modifications are my own for my personal use only. Just throwing out an idea here…

Hmmmm… glad I didn’t go overboard in making my own custom dice too much, eh?

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